Review of ‘The Armada Legacy’ by Scott Mariani


051339-FC222Mariani’s latest ends up as bit of a “Pocahontas” adventure (or Avatar for the slightly more youthful of us) with this ripping eighth installment for ex-SAS man “Don’t-You-Call-Me-‘Major'” Ben Hope.
This time it’s as personal as his foray in ‘The Mozart Conspiracy’ when he opens with Brooke being kidnapped along with ex-M15-now-turned-Clive-Cussler-wreck-hunter character, Sir Roger Forsyte, head of Neptune Marine Exploration, who is currently announcing the company’s “biggest coup since Sir Roger founded the company”. He’s just located the 1588 wreck of a Spanish Armada ship, the Santa Teresa, off the coast of Donegal. Everyone’s off to Ireland to see what’s going to happen. Just like in the last novel, there’s a swift car-crash kidnapping and murder with the beautiful Brooke being the unfortunate victim of the latest psychotic megalomaniac, Ramon Serrato. This time her looks save her as she bears an uncanny resemblance to the dead wife of the murdering drug lord and she’s whisked off to her own personal jungle Mandalay.
This, of course, sends Ben over the edge, as he trots off to Belfast after a quick call with Boonie to hunt down one Fergus Doyle, dishing out his own particular brand of violence on a group who are more smoked than the proverbial red herring. The latter, of course, turns out to be the true facts, the scene being merely a filler and insight into Ben’s tendency to be trigger happy. Mariani gets his emotional hero back on track with a visit to Spain, has him team up with Nico – a cop with a bit more punch, a heck of a motive, and coarse language to boot; more so than the likes of Luc Simon or Darcey Kane -, and then the pair of them head out to a steamy South American jungle for a denouement with the deranged Serrato.
Hard to say more without giving major spoilers away so I’ll leave it at that. Suffice it to say, this one’s pretty good. Much better than the last one, the pace is jumpy, the characters edgier, Ben’s struggle with the morality of his actions now familiar, yet still, crucially, present.



Categories: Book Reviews, Scott Mariani

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: